July 2 Weekend Harvest – Sugar Snap Peas, Bok Choy, Lettuce, Kale, Collards!

Did you have a good weekend? The weather was beautiful on the land this weekend, 70 degrees, sunny, and the perfect amount of breeze.  It started out chilly enough in the morning that I had to wear a sweatshirt, to the afternoon being able to wear a t-shirt and then at dinner time I needed a sweatshirt again.   Saturday had it’s ups and downs for me.  I enjoyed gardening, picked lots of vegetables, painted some of the fence (can you guess what color?), had a cookout with some friends who stopped by.  The downs were that I started the morning hitting my head off the car door, and then I found a snake skin (terrified of snakes) where I was sitting, and then I found said snake that was trying to hang out with me (that was not happening) and then I fell near the stream grabbing on to some thorny bushes that need to be cleared on my fall down, cutting up my hand and leg pretty badly.  Thankfully we had a first aid kid and Matthew happily covered up my hand heavily in ointment, gauze and bandages.  

All pain was forgotten when I bit into the campfire made S’more that night. 
Saturday night campfire.

Yum, Yum.

But on to the veggies because that’s what this post is about.
Keeping with the theme of all the greens we picked last week,  you’ll see a repeat of many characters – bok choy, lettuce, collards, etc.   We’ll be picking these for the next few weeks and I’ll continue to keep googling “What to do with lettuce” because there’s lots of it!

This weekend’s veggies we picked:
20160702_183614

The bok choy is growing great and is maturing from baby size to full adult size.  The bigger it grows the harder it is for me to eat all these plants (I know I planted too much but I wouldn’t change the outcome if I could).  This past weekend I spent a day freezing lots of bok choy to enjoy in the Fall and Winter months in our favorite cold weather udon noodle soup.  
This is 7 pounds of bok choy which you might think is a lot…
20160702_183204

And then I zoom out and you see to the right how many bok choy plants are left.  HAHAHAHA.  Oh gosh. I really went bok choy wild this year.
20160702_183220

Finally, it’s time! It’s sugar snap pea time! Or as I declared on Instagram this weekend “It’s raining peas, hallelujah!”   Peas are one of our favorite garden veggies even though they take forever to pick (Why don’t we create a hybrid bright pink sugar snap pea for easy spotting?).  We’ll be snacking on these and eating them in pasta for the next few weeks. Here’s the recipe we enjoy throughout Summer. 
20160702_173651

I picked all the peas that were on the medium-large side because I know once we come back to the garden in a week we’ll have hundreds more to pick.
20160702_174940

And here they are, taking off up the fence!  
20160702_102923

Lots of beautiful lettuce.  I’ve been making side salads for dinner every night just to try to keep up with it.
20160702_180922

Here’s the lettuce/kale bed:
20160702_103606

Speaking of kale, more of it picked.
20160702_175354

The collard greens looked great last weekend, but their leaves are ever larger now!
20160702_175840

I picked a bunch of them to make some veggie collard greens for me to enjoy for lunch this week.
20160702_180027

Here’s a picture of all the collards which are pretty big.   I’ll try to do a size comparison shot next weekend.
20160702_181235

What else is growing?

The tomatoes became independent, taking hold of their future.   When you transplant tomatoes outside it’s always a bit scary the first few weeks until they can handle the weather, but all seems good in tomato land now.   All the plants are turning a rich dark green which is a good sign.
20160702_103942

We pick the flowers off the tomatoes until we think they’re ready to start producing tomatoes (it’s not time yet).  By picking the flowers off them, they can give their full energy into growing to be big strong plants first.    I let one flower on a cherry tomato plant just so I could take a early tomato bite. It was delicious.
20160702_102840

Check out the itty bitty baby Brussels Sprouts spotted. They are very tiny but it’s still pretty exciting to see them there.
20160702_103841

Equally exciting, baby cabbage heads spotted!
20160702_181310

Well that’s it for this week. Tell me in the comments what you’re picking!

 

8 Comments

Leave a comment
  • I am always impressed by your gardening photos, Pamela! Did you guys move out of the city?? I might need you to move up here to Albany area so you can help us with our garden. It’s doing ok, but nothing like yours! The weeds are never-ending…and the rabbits mowed down the peas last weekend. (We even had a fence up, but they somehow got through.) I’ll just stop and stare at your photos some more instead! 🙂

    • Hey David, bummer to hear those rabbits. We put a wire fence below the wooden fence so small critters can’t get through either. So far, so good! We still live in the city, this is our weekend getaway place.

  • We’re getting a lot of cherry tomatoes at the moment. And Swiss chard. And herbs, of course. And just beginning to get cukes. Love your garden! You really are getting a haul. You may need to buy another freezer, though, for all that bok choy!

  • We are still picking lettuce….the radishes are done, they bolted…..and we picked the first peas on Monday. The slugs ate my Bok Choy….did I ever tell you how much I hate slugs? They also ate all my spinach and most of my carrot seedlings. Good thing my sweetie’s garden is slug free and doing great! We always end up with more than what we need, so we are blessed. The herbs are going mad, and the tomatoes are just starting to flower. Woo hoo!! You have energy to burn, lady – must be all those greens you’re chowing down on! Oh….and the bear was back last night. 🙁

    • That bear sure does love you Debbie! If only could you find a way to have the bear battle the slugs, instead of your garden! Excited to see all your tomatoes start to grow!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

For more information contact Pamela at pamela@pamelareed.com.    |     Privacy Policy